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Em đang học tập và nghiên cưu phát triển những dự án mạng xã hội nhưng em vẫn còn yếu về cách load database hàng triệu record, hoặc người dùng truy cập quá nhiều. Xin các tiền bối chỉ giáo và cho em xin các giải quyết nhe! Xin chân thành cảm ơn!

owned: function(){
    this.url = this.options.url.owned;
    this.parse = function(users){
        return users.map(function(user){
            return user;
        });
    };
    this.fetch({
        data: {
            screen_name : login
        }
    });
}

Abc

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Apr 16/15 at 12:58 8 Answers 49 Views -1

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Bruno is a coder from Croatia with Master’s Degrees in Computer Science and English Language and Literature. He’s the editor of SitePoint’s PHP channel > and a developer evangelist for Diffbot.com. He avoids legacy code like the plague and when picking projects makes sure they’re as cutting edge as possible. He’s a treadmill desk enthusiast and active (board)gamer who sometimes blogs.

Answers ( 18 )

    0
    Jun 5/15 at 09:13

    Changing coordinates to Eddington-Finkelstein or Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates (or others) will eliminate the coordinate singularity at the horizon. Particles fall in just fine.

    0
    Apr 20/15 at 04:01

    Changing coordinates to Eddington-Finkelstein or Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates (or others) will eliminate the coordinate singularity at the horizon. Particles fall in just fine.

    0
    Apr 20/15 at 04:00

    Changing coordinates to Eddington-Finkelstein or Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates (or others) will eliminate the coordinate singularity at the horizon. Particles fall in just fine.

    0
    Apr 20/15 at 03:58

    Changing coordinates to Eddington-Finkelstein or Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates (or others) will eliminate the coordinate singularity at the horizon. Particles fall in just fine.

    0
    Apr 20/15 at 03:58

    Changing coordinates to Eddington-Finkelstein or Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates (or others) will eliminate the coordinate singularity at the horizon. Particles fall in just fine.

    0
    Apr 20/15 at 03:43

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it iThe problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it i

    0
    Apr 20/15 at 03:41

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it

    0
    Apr 20/15 at 03:40

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it i

    0
    Apr 17/15 at 06:14

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it is expressed in 'Schwarzschild coordinates'. This is nice a coordinate system for trajectories outside a black hole, because they remind us of spherical coordinates. Unfortunately, they break at r=2M, the event horizon.

    0
    Apr 16/15 at 04:37

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it is expressed in 'Schwarzschild coordinates'. This is nice a coordinate system for trajectories outside a black hole, because they remind us of spherical coordinates. Unfortunately, they break at r=2M, the event horizon.

    0
    Apr 16/15 at 04:29

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it is expressed in 'Schwarzschild coordinates'. This is nice a coordinate system for trajectories outside a black hole, because they remind us of spherical coordinates. Unfortunately, they break at r=2M, the event horizon.

    0
    Apr 16/15 at 04:28

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it is expressed in 'Schwarzschild coordinates'. This is nice a coordinate system for trajectories outside a black hole, because they remind us of spherical coordinates. Unfortunately, they break at r=2M, the event horizon.

    0
    Apr 16/15 at 04:26

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it is expressed in 'Schwarzschild coordinates'. This is nice a coordinate system for trajectories outside a black hole, because they remind us of spherical coordinates. Unfortunately, they break at r=2M, the event horizon.

    0
    Apr 16/15 at 04:25

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it is expressed in 'Schwarzschild coordinates'. This is nice a coordinate system for trajectories outside a black hole, because they remind us of spherical coordinates. Unfortunately, they break at r=2M, the event horizon.

    0
    Apr 16/15 at 04:10

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it is expressed in 'Schwarzschild coordinates'. This is nice a coordinate system for trajectories outside a black hole, because they remind us of spherical coordinates. Unfortunately, they break at r=2M, the event horizon.

    0
    Apr 16/15 at 01:29

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it is expressed in 'Schwarzschild coordinates'. This is nice a coordinate system for trajectories outside a black hole, because they remind us of spherical coordinates. Unfortunately, they break at r=2M, the event horizon.

    0
    Apr 16/15 at 12:59

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it is expressed in 'Schwarzschild coordinates'. This is nice a coordinate system for trajectories outside a black hole, because they remind us of spherical coordinates. Unfortunately, they break at r=2M, the event horizon.

    Changing coordinates to Eddington-Finkelstein or Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates (or others) will eliminate the coordinate singularity at the horizon. Particles fall in just fine.

    0
    Apr 16/15 at 12:58

    The problem is the coordinate singularity in the Schwarzschild metric when it is expressed in 'Schwarzschild coordinates'. This is nice a coordinate system for trajectories outside a black hole, because they remind us of spherical coordinates. Unfortunately, they break at r=2M, the event horizon.

    Changing coordinates to Eddington-Finkelstein or Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates (or others) will eliminate the coordinate singularity at the horizon. Particles fall in just fine.

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