Developer devops

flag Blog

The following instructions will automatically download and provision a virtual machine for you to begin hacking on Phanbook with:

Getting Started

  1. Install Git: http://git-scm.com/downloads (or GitHub for Windows if you want a GUI). Recommend use github for Windows
  2. Install VirtualBox: https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads
  3. Install Vagrant: http://www.vagrantup.com/ (We require Vagrant 1.7.2 or later)
  4. Open a terminal
  5. Clone the project: git clone https://github.com/Phanbook/phanbook.git
  6. Enter the project directory: cd Phanbook (Recommendation Create your workspace directory and clone project there. C:/workspace/phanbook/)

Using Vagrant

When you're ready to start working, boot the VM:

chmod +x phanbook.sh && ./phanbook.sh up

Or you can runninng via command below

cd opsfiles && vagrant up

Vagrant will prompt you for your admin password. This is so it can mount your local files inside the VM for an easy workflow.

(The first time you do this, it will take a while as it downloads the VM image and installs it. Go grab a coffee.)

Note to Linux users: Your Phanbook directory cannot be on an ecryptfs mount or you will receive an error: exportfs: /home/your/path/to/Phanbook does not support NFS export

Note to OSX/Linux users: Vagrant will mount your local files via an NFS share. Therefore, make sure that NFS is installed or else you'll receive the error message:

Mounting NFS shared folders failed. This is most often caused by the NFS
client software not being installed on the guest machine. Please verify
that the NFS client software is properly installed, and consult any resources
specific to the linux distro you're using for more information on how to
do this.

For example, on Ubuntu, you can install NFS support by installing nfs-kernel-server with apt-get install.

Once the machine has booted up, you can shell into it by typing:

./phanbook.sh ssh

Or

cd opsfiles && vagrant ssh

The Phanbook code is found in the /usr/share/nginx/html/www directory in the image.

Note to Windows users: You cannot run vagrant ssh from a cmd prompt; you'll receive the error message:

`vagrant ssh` isn't available on the Windows platform. You are still able
to SSH into the virtual machine if you get a Windows SSH client (such as
PuTTY). The authentication information is shown below:

Host: 192.168.33.33
Port: 2222
Username: vagrant
Private key: C:/Users/Your Name/.vagrant.d/insecure_private_key

At this point, you will want to get an SSH client, and use it to connect to your Vagrant VM instead. We recommend PuTTY:

PuTTY Download Link

You may use this client to connect to the VM by using vagrant/vagrant as your username/password, or by using PuTTYGen to import the insecure_private_key file (mentioned above) into a PuTTY profile to quickly access your VM.

Let's contribution for phanbook.

  1. checkout your new branch (feature/your-name-branch)
$ ## creating new branch
$ git checkout -b feature/{your-new-branch-name}
  1. commit your files and let's push
git push origin feature/{your-new-branch-name}

Shutting down the VM

When you're done working on Phanbook, you can shut down Vagrant with:

cd opsfiles && vagrant halt

or you can running

./phanbook.sh halt
in progress
Jul 29/15 at 05:57 15 Answers 19 Views 0

About the Author

I'm creating a website that provides a service to people that allows them to access their documents and desktops remotely, and obviously, they should be the only ones that can access their information, but how do I go about doing that?

Answers ( 11 )

    0
    Jul 30/15 at 02:29

    ot entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the first s

    0
    Jul 29/15 at 02:59

    Entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the firs

    jects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the firs

    0
    Jul 29/15 at 02:59

    ot entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the first s

    0
    Jul 29/15 at 02:52

    ot entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the first s

    0
    Jul 29/15 at 02:52

    ot entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the first s

    0
    Jul 29/15 at 02:48

    his process is not entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the first stars (thought to be much more massive, hot and luminous than stars today) in relatively small dwarf galaxies, but it is not possible to see these directly. Conversely, high redshifts qusars may have played some role, either in direct reionisation or more likely in regulation star formation.

    0
    Jul 29/15 at 02:47

    his process is not entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the first stars (thought to be much more massive, hot and luminous than stars today) in relatively small dwarf galaxies, but it is not possible to see these directly. Conversely, high redshifts qusars may have played some role, either in direct reionisation or more likely in regulation star formation.

    0
    Jul 29/15 at 02:45

    his process is not entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the first stars (thought to be much more massive, hot and luminous than stars today) in relatively small dwarf galaxies, but it is not possible to see these directly. Conversely, high redshifts qusars may have played some role, either in direct reionisation or more likely in regulation star formation.

    0
    Jul 29/15 at 02:44

    his process is not entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the first stars (thought to be much more massive, hot and luminous than stars today) in relatively small dwarf galaxies, but it is not possible to see these directly. Conversely, high redshifts qusars may have played some role, either in direct reionisation or more likely in regulation star formation.

    0
    Jul 29/15 at 02:44

    his process is not entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the first stars (thought to be much more massive, hot and luminous than stars today) in relatively small dwarf galaxies, but it is not possible to see these directly. Conversely, high redshifts qusars may have played some role, either in direct reionisation or more likely in regulation star formation.

    0
    Jul 29/15 at 02:43

    his process is not entirely understood in terms of when it happened, how quickly it happened and what objects were primarily responsible. The thing is that it was probably the first stars (thought to be much more massive, hot and luminous than stars today) in relatively small dwarf galaxies, but it is not possible to see these directly. Conversely, high redshifts qusars may have played some role, either in direct reionisation or more likely in regulation star formation.

Leave a reply

 Prev question

Next question